A brief visit to Cornwall

Tuesday 4th October 2022

Truro bus station

Despite Saturday’s rail strike I managed a quick visit to Cornwall over the weekend which entailed an unwelcome long drive as I had a commitment in Truro on Sunday morning I had to fulfill. As I seldom drive long distances these days the trip reminded me of the relative advantages and disadvantages of weekend train travel compared to driving. A Super Off-Peak Return with a Railcard from my home station, Hassocks, to Truro, would have been £93.30; which is cheaper even than the cost of the petrol used (over £100) let alone the other mileage related and overhead costs of running a car, so the railway wins on that score.

On journey time, by leaving at the crack of dawn (actually well before it) going down and returning on Sunday late morning and afternoon, I managed the journey in almost exactly five hours, meaning I was home by 16:30 whereas it would have been 19:57 had I got the train. Not being used to driving, and perhaps because I only took a short stop during the drive, I felt exhausted after five hours of concentration, whereas train travel is always much more relaxing with the joy of window gazing and catching up on reading trade magazines, newspapers, surfing online and fellow passenger watching.

On the other hand I appreciated the private space in my car and not getting annoyed with an increasing trend these days of anti-social passenger behaviour such as listening to short clips being broadcast from social media channels on smartphone speakers or even telephone conversations on loudspeakers and sometimes even other’s favourite playlists blaring out.

Concerns that the road ahead might be congested causing frustrating delays are about the same as the risk of delays on the tracks these days so no clear advantage either way there.

As a committed bus and train user I’ll be back on board for my next long distance journey for sure; but it was a novelty to take such a long drive which had it not been for the strike action I wouldn’t have ever contemplated.

Now to see how long it takes GWR to refund my train tickets that were unused. I’ve already had an email apologising for the delay due to “high volumes of claims which is preventing us from assessing your claim as quickly as usual”.

While down in Cornwall I had a few hours spare on Saturday afternoon so took a circular bus ride from Truro via Redruth and Newquay and back on three bus routes I hadn’t had the pleasure of experiencing in their current format for many years, or at all.

All three routes are operated by GoCornwall as part of Cornwall Council’s Transport for Cornwall subsidised network for the county being funded by the special five year deal agreed with the Government which saw £23.5 million towards more buses, new buses and cheaper fares.

First up was route 40 (grey with a hint of green on the map) which links Truro with Redruth serving a group of villages lying east of Redruth such as St Day, Crafthandy and Carharrack not covered by First Kernow’s trunk routes T1 and T2 as well as the Treliske area of Truro as the bus leaves the city via the hospital, college and Threemilestone.

I doubt many passengers noticed the Plymouth City Bus branding; but I did.

I caught the 12:45 journey from Truro. It’s part of the two-hourly through service that takes an hour from end to end with also two-hourly ‘short’ journeys at either end of the route making for an hourly service between Truro and Threemilestone and between the aforementioned three villages and Redruth which is a very decent service for the population being served.

We took eight passengers out of Truro, five alighting in Treliske, one in St Day and two in Carharrack. During the journey we picked up one in Treliske and one in Threemilestone both of whom alighted in Carharrack where four got on as did two in St Day who travelled to Redruth, with one more passenger boarding in the middle of nowhere and alighting in St Day. So not bad for a Saturday early afternoon journey in a rural area.

But what was somewhat disconcerting was the talk among three of the Carharrack villagers about the unreliability of the service and how they’ve had to wait for more than an hour on recent occasions. This is concerning to hear, as it’s all very well running more frequent services, running new buses, reducing the fares – that’s all great stuff – but if the services are unreliable, all the goodwill is lost, as passengers won’t stand for being left stranded or having an unwelcome long wait especially on low frequency rural routes. Not all passengers are Twitter followers where I see @GoCornwallBus are tweeting cancellations on its routes; perhaps it’s time to review service levels so they’re more in line with the availability of drivers in the current circumstances.

Perhaps one route that could be withdrawn to reduce resources is the 88 (light lime green on the map) which has one bus running every two hours between Redruth and Newquay, which was my next trip. I’d been told by various sources this really is a route serving no-one and since introduction in March 2020 has been regularly seen with no passengers on board.

The 13:39 from Redruth on Saturday afternoon didn’t disappoint. I had the bus to myself for the journey all the way to Newquay, only picking a handful of passengers up as we took the circuitous route around the town via the station to the bus station where other routes are also available.

It just goes to show just because two towns don’t have a bus route between them, doesn’t mean there’s a demand for one.

I left route 88 as it entered Newquay to catch my third and final bus of the trio, a route 85 (orange on the map) heading out of the town on its way to Truro. It’s a much longer journey (78 minutes) between the two towns than the direct hourly route 93 (53 minutes) but that’s because it serves such delightful villages as Crantock, Cubert, Holywell Bay, St Newlyn East, Zelah, Allet and Shortlanesend.

We dropped a few short riders off as we headed out of Newquay leaving us with six on board for the rest of the journey including four who went the whole way through to Truro and two who alighted in Holywell Bay and that was it until we reached the outskirts of Truro where we picked up four travelling into the city.

Route 85 is mostly operated by double deckers but sadly I copped a single decker.

One very positive development since my last visit to Cornwall is the publication of a bus timetable covering the whole county replacing the previous three book arrangement. Bus Times is dated 4th September 2022 and to an A4 format, which brings back many happy memories for me. And just like the erstwhile Brighton & Hove version is comprehensive including all Transport for Cornwall bus routes as well as First Kernow’s commercial network and Stagecoach’s route in Saltash.

It’s a very welcome initiative and when so many operators are misguidedly of the view “it’s all online” so why bother with printed timetables, those involved in its production deserve hearty congratulations. I do hope others will take heed of this excellent development.

The following few comments are meant in the spirit of constructive suggestions which hopefully can be included in the next edition for next summer.

The network map is a great asset to the publication but it is very small to read and I would recommend a larger scale and perhaps include a fold out arrangement which could then be detached from the book if needed. It’s also quite challenging to distinguish the similar colours used for different routes.

There are two pages of ‘Town Zones’ which show boundary points for various tickets but what would really be useful is an actual map of each town showing where the bus routes go. The Network Map just has a large circle for each of the towns so its impossible to see where the bus routes go. Towns like Falmouth, Penzance and Truro have good penetration of bus routes but it’s impossible to know where they go. For example, on my Saturday trip I wasn’t entirely confident I was able to make a change from the 88 to the 85 short of the terminus as there’s nothing to tell me where both routes go within the town.

One issue that comes through from First Kernow’s policy of branding their routes, in some cases without route numbers, is where to place them in a timetable book which logically has routes listed in numerical order. It’s resulted in high profile branded routes such as the Coasters (Atlantic, Falmouth and Lands End) and Mousehole (as well as the more minor Sunseeker) being banished towards the back of the book being placed in between route 515 and routes L1/L2/L3 in alphabetical order after the numbered routes. Perhaps it would make sense to give all these routes a number as well as brand names (as Tinner T1/T2 and Coast to Coast U1/U1A are) so you know where to find them in the book. It would also help if page numbers were added to the Index showing on which page these routes can be found.

Sadly there are one or two proofing errors in the new timetable, for example, the timetable for route 18 (also known as the Tin Coaster) between Penzance and Pendeen appears in the index of places served at the front, but the timetable itself is missing. Route 27’s timetable is shown for Mondays to Fridays but Saturdays and Sundays is missing. Also, St Columb Major and Minor are missing from the index.

I also wonder if the paper quality might be better reduced in thickness so as to reduce the weight of the book as it is quite a hefty affair. But these minor comments aside, it really is good to see this publication, and even more so, I picked up my copy from a boxful on the bus on route 40. Which is just as well as both Truro and Newquay Travel Shops were closed on Saturday.

I had the chance to see the new branding for the route which used to be marketed as Unibus.

Routes U1 and U1A from Falmouth via the University at Penryn to Truro were extended to Newquay to replace other routes a while ago and have had their bespoke blue livery adapted to incorporate the new Coast to Coast brand.

At the same time route U2 which links Falmouth, Penryn and Redruth has been branded as Copper.

The only problem was both buses I saw in Truro bus station were operating on routes T1 and T2 which should have buses branded as Tinner.

As someone observed on Twitter. If you’re going to brand bus routes, you must give attention to getting it right on the ground, otherwise all the effort is wasted and only serves to confuse passengers.

Finally for Cornwall a shout out to Keith Shayshutt who has produced another book about buses in the county. It’s a rather specialist publication for a niche market, but if you like working timetables and understanding the mystery of how rural bus networks work, then this is definitely the book for you.

Western National Working Timetables 1996 as its name implies is all about how Cornwall’s network operated just before the impact of the newly created Aberdeen based First Bus centralised control ousted the much admired practices adopted in the Western-super-Mare based Badgerline company had facilitated.

This is explained in Mark Howarth’s fascinating Foreword to the book. Mark was managing director of the company in the Badgerline era and of course went on to form Western Greyhound which also adopted intricate inter-working between routes.

There are details about the 1996 fleet, depots and outstations, route statistics and profitability but the majority of the book (a hundred of the 120 pages) is given over to full details of how the working timetables worked along with contemporary photographs of the day as well as route and network maps and ‘History Facts’ to fascinate the reader.

“A book not for the fainthearted, but if you like detail, and lots of it, then this book will appeal” Keith, who really is an expert in the subject, comments on the back cover. I totally agree. I found it a fascinating read and insight into how bus networks across a mainly rural county very much seasonal in nature too. If you want to find out “how a Bristol VR gets to Port Isaac on service 124 and how a Tavistock based Dart ends up at Delabole on Service 122” this really is the book for you, and at a price of £23.50 offers great value too.

This is Volume 1 covering Western National’s Cornish Division. Keith promises Volume 2 covering Devon and East Cornwall will follow. It can be purchased from all the usual online outlets including eBay and Browns Books.

Roger French

Blogging timetable: 06:00 TThS

40 thoughts on “A brief visit to Cornwall

Add yours

  1. One typo sticks out for me: Weston-super-Mare, not Western! Otherwise an excellent article. As regards the new livery on First’s 33472, is Treliske Hospital (on the bus) the same as the Royal Cornwall (on the map)? Visitors are readily confused by such anomalies.

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  2. Certainly agree with the silliness of giving routes brand names alone, particularly as “behind the scenes” companies give them numbers anyway. And route branding for buses in rural areas except in rare circumstances will always cause problems with “wrong” allocations for whatever reason.

    Sorry “BusandTrainUser” clearly doesn’t extend to “Coach user”, where peace and quiet is also almost always guaranteed.

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  3. Roger unfortunately comes across a Victor Meldrew old man with his rant about you tube etc. I personally don’t get on any bus or train without Absolute 80s blasting out in my ears. If am watching a You Tube video it’s always on loudspeaker. Move with the times & accept its the social norm now or simply keep to using your “PRIVATE CAR” & leave public transport to those of us who genuinely enjoy it. As an aside National Express West Midlands have had its brand new E054 on display at this weeks Conservative Party Conference here in Brum.

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    1. I’m in agreement with Roger over this. I’m happy to let others listen to their choice of entertainment, provided I don’t have to listen to it as well. If I was listening to music, I wouldn’t expect others to endure my tastes (Kraftwerk, Jean-Michel Jarre, etc.) either. Not an “old man” view either – I’m 46 and have been brought up to respect the wishes of others!

      Liked by 2 people

  4. There seem to be real problems with cancellations in Deven and Cornwall. Stagecoach services seem to be in real trouble with mass cancellations each day. I believe the council in Cornwall has taken it up with the Traffic Commissioners

    I am not convinced by route branding in rural areas. The buses will invariably end up on the wrong route many routes interwork as well and buses get transferred around between business units
    The only way around it would be to have spare buses for each route which would be very expensive

    Using twitter for cancellations in my view is not a good idea. First you need to register with twitter and most people will not be so they cannot see the information. Second twitter is full of PR junk etc so looking for cancellations can be like looking for a needle in a haystack

    GoAhead are usually pretty good at updating their website so you can pull up the timetable and it will tell you if there are any issues. Simple and effective but of limited use if you are not at home

    What’s not so good is the real time tracking. It seems to be the standard system most bus companies use. It is a case of developers trying to be too clever. Unless you are a bus enthusiast you are not interested in where every bus is. You just want the route number and destination and to see what time your bus is going to arrive at your stop. Rember as well most people will be trying to do this on a small screen on a Smart Phone so a map with all the buses shown on it is pretty much useless.

    The practice of not giving a route a number is not good in my view nor is giving them random prefix letters as it makes it harder to find the route you are interested in. Bus companies as well are not consistent as to how they index them. Some mainly index them in Alpha Numeric order but others ignore the Prefix and order them numerically

    Unless they have run out of numbers which is unlikely, I see little sense in prefix letters. I suspect its some marketing persons bright idea

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    1. One solution is for companies to have their Twitter feed on their website. This should allow enough space for each day’s cancellations and avoids the need to register on another website just to check if your bus is running.

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      1. Twitter now requires you to register to read it and the vast majority of bus users will not have twitter accounts

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      2. Twitter does NOT require you to register to read Tweets only to respond . I read Diamond Buses tweets most day & NXWM Twitter account on service updates. I am not on Twitter or any other non bus social media site. Everyone can access an operators Twitter Account unless they are projected.

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      3. Rubbish! I’ve just looked at the Diamond Buses Twitter feed. Twitter allows you to read the first couple of tweets, the requires you to log-in or sign up.

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      4. Just checked on my dads smartphone; he is in his 80s; & can access of all Diamond Buses tweets if you go via Google Chrome from the last 12 months on android & he obviously is not on social media can’t comment on Apple or Apps

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      5. Nope. Google Chrome, Firefox on Android; Firefox, Edge on PC – first two tweets show, then “See more Tweets from Diamond Bus Midlands – log in or sign up”.

        As Gareth says: it would be useful to have the feed ON the website.

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      6. I have just emailed Twitter helpline & you cannot view Twitter via an app however you can view anyone’s profile on most browsers & they say you view Twitter as long as your cookies are disabled on Android

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  5. sThereeem to be real problems with cancellations in Deven and Cornwall. Stagecoach services seem to be in real trouble with mass cancellations each day. I believe the council in Cornwall has taken it up with the Traffic Commissioners

    I am not convinced by route branding in rural areas. The buses will invariably end up on the wrong route many routes interwork as well and buses get transferred around between business units
    The only way around it would be to have spare buses for each route which would be very expensive

    Using twitter for cancellations in my view is not a good idea. First you need to register with twitter and most people will not be so they cannot see the information. Second twitter is full of PR junk etc so looking for cancellations can be like looking for a needle in a haystack

    GoAhead are usually pretty good at updating their website so you can pull up the timetable and it will tell you if there are any issues. Simple and effective but of limited use if you are not at home

    What’s not so good is the real time tracking. It seems to be the standard system most bus companies use. It is a case of developers trying to be too clever. Unless you are a bus enthusiast you are not interested in where every bus is. You just want the route number and destination and to see what time your bus is going to arrive at your stop. Rember as well most people will be trying to do this on a small screen on a Smart Phone so a map with all the buses shown on it is pretty much useless.

    The practice of not giving a route a number is not good in my view nor is giving them random prefix letters as it makes it harder to find the route you are interested in. Bus companies as well are not consistent as to how they index them. Some mainly index them in Alpha Numeric order but others ignore the Prefix and order them numerically

    Unless they have run out of numbers which is unlikely, I see little sense in prefix letters. I suspect its some marketing persons bright idea

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  6. Perhaps pressure could be applied to both East and West Sussex to issue a combined timetable to cover the WHOLE county rather the the current apparent lack of such a publication.

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  7. I like a good bus timetable booklet as much as the next bus user, in comparison to leaflets, but I don’t get the enthusiasm for having an entire County’s worth of routes in one book. As Roger commented, it gets heavy which will put people of picking one up, and also gets more complicated for the average person to use. As for one combining West and East Sussex, why? That is just bonkers in my opinion! Carefully carved up areas are the best of both worlds, possibly in line with Districts, but not blindly.

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  8. The Transport for Cornwall Web Site seems quite good. They have an interactive map but make the common mistake of having it small in order to fit the web page which makes it very difficult to use. All they need to do is to give an option to make it full screen

    Another potential issue is you have the Transport for Cornwall Web site which lists all service and the individual bus companies web site
    Unless all the data is derived from a single source there is a high risk of inconsistent data

    At present there are no details of cancellation and disruptions to services. I guess that may still be work in progress

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  9. Yes: branded routes without numbers = bad idea. And if the name appears in the destination box it can be very confusing for non-locals (see Winchester’s ‘The Spring’).
    One must presume that Richard Jones’s comments are tongue-in-cheek: subjecting others to one’s phone calls and music is selfish and inconsiderate philistinism.
    Comprehensive area timetables, yes; A4, no. The late-lamented B&H timetable was marred by its lack of portability.

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  10. To me the biggest problem is that, if just one timetable changes, effectively you lose confidence in the whole book. Granted, supplements can be added at the point of issue – but you wouldn’t know about any changes once you’d got the book home. There is therefore a necessity for timetables to clearly have start and expiry dates, for all seasonal changes to be clearly included – and for the operators only to make changes on the date that the new timetable becomes valid.

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  11. In the timetable book for Transport for Cornwall on the Map it has the routes shown on a circle with a background colour. Nowhere does it tell you what it means. Usually, it tends to indicate the bus company operating the service but, in this case, they look pretty random, far too many colours used as well making it difficult to identify them as colour reproduction on screens can vary quite a lot

    The map also highlights the problem of routes just having names, there is no logical reason as to why these routes cannot have a route number as well as a Marketing name

    As usual with these maps there is no key. ie List of route numbers

    Probably Cornwall could have 3 Area timetable booklets. It would make them a more manageable size

    The map as most of them do just shows a large white circle for the towns so you have no idea of the bus service within the towns
    The only maps that seem to exist are ones showing the limits of the towns fare zones

    To ensure timetable books are kept up to date they really need to limit timetable changes to every 6 months, Given the current instability of bus services that seems unlikely though

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  12. The Furst Kernow branded liveries look smart, but as Roger said if operated on the wrong routes the effort is totally undermined, IMO it could be perceived as misrepresentation (claiming to go to town A but actually going to town F). I’m not a fan of silly route names either (TrentBarton does my head in).

    Finally, when there’s a Transport for Cornwall brand First’s separate existence is confusing. Everything should be under the Transport for Cornwall brand in a unified network.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. At the risk of sounding like a broken record, these short notice cancellations, suggested by the Carharrack travelers, is that they will lose another few percent of passengers for good. I have mentioned this before and we must be nearing the point where some pretty big pay rises will be needed to keep the current level of services; obviously this cost will have to come from somewhere and the mood music of the last few weeks would suggest that this will not be public funding.

    The alternative to making driving jobs more attractive is some pretty serious service cuts which might increase the calls for public ownership, despite the fact that this would not help the situation.

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    1. The real problem is constant cuts to service and high increses in fares makes buses unattractive. In many areas a taxi is a more attractive option

      As bus companies lose passengers costs increase exponentially . The bus compnie respone then is to cut services and increase fares

      The only solution is to get more passengers but bus companies are useless at that

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  14. The Transport for Cornwall network is great but what lets it down is reliability. In my experience on the T1/T2 which together form a fairly frequent service every 15 minutes, but in my experience there’s been no bus for 45 minutes.

    And what’s worse, there is no unified app for Cornwall. Sure, Go Cornwall and First have their apps with live tracking, but neither are well advertised, and the First app is not at all. If you don’t know who operates the route, it’s all the more confusing. I only found out about the First app by asking the driver. If they are running such an unreliable service why can’t they make it publicly known there’s live tracking, or better why can’t TfC make an app for all the live departures to relieve their paying customers of the confusion?

    As for the 88, I haven’t a clue why it still exists. From what I remember the entire journey is on a fast road (the old A30 perhaps?) With little to no stops. A well-written blog reflecting the views of residents and ‘tourists’ alike, as always. Keep it up.

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    1. Apps in general are a mess and many are difficult to use and often unreliable

      I agree a single app is the way to go
      Bus tracking is also difficult. Most people will want to track a bus when stood at a bus stop. They do not want to be trying to navigate around a map on a small screen on a Smart Phone

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      1. Agreed. But having two separate apps for differently operated routes is even messier.

        I would like to clarify that when I say ‘live tracking’ this extends to live departures and service updates. This extends to departure boards at bus stops – Some have live departures for GCB and not for First – and vice versa, with it not being clear which is which. I suppose this is a small complaint – we’re lucky we have live departures at all. The bigger issue is reliability due to lack of drivers available.

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  15. And that is exactly the conundrum we have now . . . if wages are increased to recruit and retain drivers, then fares will need to increase proportionately.
    However, public opinion (and passengers) will not countenance fares increases in the current financial climate, so that option is ruled out.
    So, service levels should be reduced to the level that staff availability can guarantee reliable operation . . . but public opinion will be against that as well (social exclusion, green agenda and so on).
    There is a third way . . . release funds from Central Government to permit LTAs to financially support bus services, by means of allowing wages to rise to a sustainable level. That is what Ken Livingstone did 20 years ago in London to stem the haemorraging of drivers (up to 50% staff turnover some years) . . . but the Treasury will never agree to that.

    I’m not sure that simply throwing money at the problem will work now . . . after the last two years, I think something else is required to retain staff; perhaps shorter shifts for no loss of pay? That’ll come with another cost, though, so that’ll be a non-starter.

    Anyone got any other ideas?? I haven’t . . .

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    1. Perhaps bring more flexible on driver shifts and treating staff better should be the way forward. My local independent offers a choice of weekday or weekend work, or just schools work. Split shifts would be a popular thing to abolish.

      Perhaps the commercial bus industry is inevitably heading yowards oblivion and government will have to accept that buses should be operated like in the rest of the developed world. This will require much more public spending (by UK standards, but not by European ones).

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    2. Fares in many areas are already so high buses are not even comptative against taxis if there are two travelling. Add into the equation buses are at best frequently only hourly and even then cancelltions and late running is common then buses are not an attractive option

      To improve services funding has to come from some where. Perhaps a sensible tax on public parking say £12 a year per parking place. Maybe a small levy on fuel. The problem here is EV’s. THey will probably end up being taxed per mile

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  16. I suspect that bus fans start talking less to themselves and more to ordinary people (non bus users). It’s nothing out of the ordinary for any business. Buses, like any business, have to find a way to appeal to non-users. Some of them, but too few and far between, do it already. Usually, maybe even because of it, they aren’t making such a song and dance about it. Nothing is quite as unappetising as blatant hypocrisy.

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    1. Thats a big problem over 80% of the population do not ue buses. In general though bus companies ignore this market as buses start to late, finish to early, dont go to where people work or shop and are to infrequent

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I’m not sure it’s so simple. I don’t see such a blanket distinction between services offered by the survivors and the less successful? Mostly they’re doing the same sort of things. It’s something else.

        Rather, where has “use it or lose it” worked? In any walk of life, threatening me isn’t the way to get what you want. It has the opposite effect. Is everyone else so different?

        I’m not looking for a sugar daddy. But is it too much to expect us to be on the same side?

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      2. Bob, your comments go around in circles. I’m struggling to understand the point your trying to make beyond seemingly revelling in repeating “all bus services are rubbish, no-one wants to use them, no-one bothers trying to market routes”

        Can’t run earlier or later services if there aren’t the drivers available with the somewhat unattractive current wages and working hours the job has. More early / late services means more early or late shifts, or worse, split shifts all at unsociable hours. Good luck finding drivers for those.
        You could pay more to retain staff but most companies can’t afford to raise fares without driving away passengers. So what’s your solution other than whinging about it repeatedly on here? Subsidies don’t seem to be the answer simply as companies can’t get the staff in the first place.

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  17. The Royal Mail is suffering the same problem that bus companies have. A rapidly declining number of customers. There is little the Royal mail can do about the decline in the number of letters being posted

    Bus companies though have a vast untapped market they can attract as people still need to travel and over 80% of people do not use buses at present. Are the bus companies offerings at present going to attract them? In my view No.

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    1. Except that whilst Royal Mail letter volumes are decreasing, the explosion of parcels traffic since 2020 has more than outweighed the impact.

      The vast untapped market of 80% involves a huge number of car users and whilst the offering can be made more attractive, the ability to do so is constrained. Bus operators have a toxic mix to navigate. Patronage is c.75% of what it was. There’s a lack of drivers as a) staff are attracted to better paid LGV jobs or b) were Eastern European who went back in Spring 2020 and can’t come back (or wouldn’t want to) because of Brexit. To try and attract staff, wages need to go up but the ability to recover via the farebox is limited, and this is on top of other escalating costs like fuel, spare parts, other utilities.

      There are some very good examples of best practice out there but there needs to be some wholesale changes in the approach of government (local and national) as well as the bus industry.

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      1. As I see it only government can solve the driver shortage. Private operators don’t have the resources to offer better conditions without government support. Without this support government will not achieve a raft of other policy objectives connected to economic growth through better connectivity, or net zero etc.

        In the US buses are also facing a labour shortage post Covid. This is how Portland’s Trimet Transit Agency is responding by offering a good salary, with benefits and job security.

        https://news.trimet.org/2022/05/restoring-workforce-improving-service-adding-electric-buses-priority-in-trimets-adopted-budget/

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